Short-term Efficacy Of Latanoprostene Bunod For The Treatment Of Open-angle Glaucoma And Ocular Hypertension: A Systematic Literature Review And A Network Meta-analysis

BMJ Journals
11 Jan, 2021 ,

Paul Harasymowycz et al. carried out a systematic literature review of 106 trials to determine the efficacy of latanoprostene bunod (LBN) in comparison to other medications for open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension on lowering intraocular pressure. LBN was found to be more effective than most of the beta blockers and other prostaglandin analogues like bimatoprost 0.01%, latanoprost and tafluprost and significantly superior to unoprostone.

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Abstract

Background/aims To assess the comparative efficacy of latanoprostene bunod (LBN), a novel prostaglandin analogue (PGA), to other medications for open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension on lowering intraocular pressure (IOP).

Methods A systematic literature review adapted from the Li et al (Ophthalmology, 2016) study was conducted. Medline, Embase and PubMed were searched for randomised controlled trials published between 1 January 2014 and 19 March 2020. Studies had to report IOP reduction after 3 months for at least two different treatments among placebo, PGAs (bimatoprost 0.01%, bimatoprost 0.03%, latanoprost, LBN, tafluprost, unoprostone) or apraclonidine, betaxolol, brimonidine, brinzolamide, carteolol, dorzolamide, levobunolol, timolol, travoprost. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed to provide the relative effect in terms of mean difference (95% credible interval) of IOP reduction and ranking probabilities. Surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) was generated.

Results A total of 106 trials were included with data for 18 523 participants. LBN was significantly more effective than unoprostone (−3.45 (−4.77 to −2.12)). Although the relative effect was not significative, compared with other PGAs, LBN numerically outperformed latanoprost (−0.70 (−1.83 to 0.43)) and tafluoprost (−0.41 (−1.87 to 1.07)), was similar to bimatoprost 0.01% (-0.02(−1.59 to 1.55)) and was slightly disadvantaged by bimatoprost 0.03% (−0.17 (−1.42 to 1.07)). LBN was significantly more efficient than the beta-blockers apraclonidine, betaxolol, brimonidine, brinzolamide, carteolol, dorzolamide and timolol. According to SUCRA, LBN was ranked second after bimatoprost 0.03%, followed by bimatoprost 0.01%.

Conclusion LBN was significantly more effective than the PGA unoprostone and most of the beta-blockers. Compared with the most widely used PGAs, LBN numerically outperformed latanoprost and travoprost and was similar to bimatoprost 0.01%.